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Wreck MV Fairwind

Fish Rock

$0.00

Type of Dive: Wreck diving

Access: Boat

Minimum Qualification: Decompression Procedure & Extended Range

Depth: 87 meters

 

Wreck Details:

Name: MV Fairwind (formerly MSL251)
Length: 120ft
Beam: 24ft
Draught: 9ft
Sunk: 1950

The ship's bow is intact, as are the massive rudder and the twin props; but the rear bridge and superstructure have collapsed inward, revealing a jumble of artifacts including cooking implements and a stack of batteries much like auto batteries, which illustrate the fact that the ship was powered by diesel engines.

In the central hold, there is a large open section that backs into an open passageway that leads further aft; the passageway is tight though, and while penetration may be possible; it is dangerous.  

As you explore this wreck, use caution.  Locals have been fishing it for years, and there are kevlar traces that pose an entanglement hazard; even with a sharp knife, they're difficult to cut.   In addition, an unpredictable three to four knot current often washes the site and has caused several dives to be called off. 

While the wreck itself is impressive, so is the marine life.  The ship's hull is still bare in many areas, but there is quite a lot of coral clinging to it, plus there are some nice-sized anemones.  Game fish cruise around the wreck in an endless swirl of motion, and on days when the weather and sea conditions are cooperative, the Fairwind is an outstanding subject for photography.  Difficult to reach and requiring extensive planning and preparation beforehand, this incredible wreck is one that will haunt your memory for years to come. 

 

Regular price $0.00

Type of Dive: Wreck diving

Access: Boat

Minimum Qualification: Decompression Procedure & Extended Range

Depth: 87 meters

 

Wreck Details:

Name: MV Fairwind (formerly MSL251)
Length: 120ft
Beam: 24ft
Draught: 9ft
Sunk: 1950

The ship's bow is intact, as are the massive rudder and the twin props; but the rear bridge and superstructure have collapsed inward, revealing a jumble of artifacts including cooking implements and a stack of batteries much like auto batteries, which illustrate the fact that the ship was powered by diesel engines.

In the central hold, there is a large open section that backs into an open passageway that leads further aft; the passageway is tight though, and while penetration may be possible; it is dangerous.  

As you explore this wreck, use caution.  Locals have been fishing it for years, and there are kevlar traces that pose an entanglement hazard; even with a sharp knife, they're difficult to cut.   In addition, an unpredictable three to four knot current often washes the site and has caused several dives to be called off. 

While the wreck itself is impressive, so is the marine life.  The ship's hull is still bare in many areas, but there is quite a lot of coral clinging to it, plus there are some nice-sized anemones.  Game fish cruise around the wreck in an endless swirl of motion, and on days when the weather and sea conditions are cooperative, the Fairwind is an outstanding subject for photography.  Difficult to reach and requiring extensive planning and preparation beforehand, this incredible wreck is one that will haunt your memory for years to come.